Design

Cornerstone Custom Home

Cornerstone Custom Home

When beginning a design, one of our guiding rules is to integrate a home into its surroundings.  Since each house is located on its own particular site, oriented in its own particular way, and has its own particular view, it should be different from any other house.

Pietro Belluschi, the late Portland, Oregon architect said this:  “Frank Lloyd Wright used the word ‘organic.’  The way it is understood is that every wall, every ceiling, every piece of design relates to everything else and relates to the ground on which it’s placed, which relates to the trees and the view and so on.”  Once we identify the unique relationship between the elements of the site and the building itself, we strive to maximize that into each custom home design.

A great deal of our behavior is formed by the spaces that we inhabit.  Too often there is an incongruity between the elements designed into a house and the activities planned for that space.  The spaces that make up the house should be created to conform to the events that will take place there.  In other words, a person should not have to change their lifestyle because their house was poorly designed.

Winston Churchill once said, “We shape our buildings and thereafter they shape us.”  A custom design will provide you with appropriate places for all of your activities and possessions.  By eliminating any conflict between your home’s design and its ultimate use, your home will take on greater livability.  Our goal is to create a building that provides a living and dynamic place to call home.  The features which give character to a place are not limited merely to activities, but include other elements as well, such as the view, the sun shining through a window, or a bird on the sill.

Deck of custom home

When designing a home, it is important to consider your outside living spaces.

As we approach the design of a custom home or remodel, we try to be open-minded concerning the styles, techniques, and materials that we incorporate into that design.  Construction materials and techniques continually change.  We follow, and even try to anticipate these changes in order to build you the best home at a reasonable, affordable price.

We continually search for innovative ideas, new materials, and creative ways of using traditional materials.  We tend to avoid designs, materials and techniques that have no proven track record.  These are very likely to lead us away from our original intent:  To build durable and energy conserving homes that provide a warm and supportive environment for their inhabitants.

We realize, of course, that everyone has their own style and preferences concerning home design.  We do not wish to stifle that individuality, but rather offer this brief explanation of our philosophy simply to act as a point of beginning dialogue.

Noel Carey

Lex Morgan